Nikola's voorzitter treedt af, aandelen crashen na beschuldigingen van fraud

Nikola's voorzitter treedt af, aandelen crashen na beschuldigingen van fraud

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Federale minister van Volksgezondheid vuurt terug op Ford, zegt dat de provinciale politie ook quarantainevoorschriften kan handhaven – CTV News

Federale minister van Volksgezondheid vuurt terug op Ford, zegt dat de provinciale politie ook quarantainevoorschriften kan handhaven – CTV News

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OTTAWA — Health Minister Patty Hajdu fired back at Ontario Premier Doug Ford on Thursday, reminding him that provincial police can enforce quarantine rules too.

Her comments come afterthe premier lambasted the quarantine systemas “broken” in a Wednesday press conference, saying federal health officers aren’t laying charges against Quarantine Act rule breakers.

“I’ll just remind Premier Ford that in fact, the OPP, who are participating in enforcing the quarantine with the RCMP, have full authority to lay charges,” Hajdu told CTV Power Play Host Evan Solomon during Thursday’s episode.

“So I would encourage him to speak with the Ontario Provincial Police and tell them that if they feel that charges are appropriate, that they should go ahead and use the Quarantine Act as they’ve been empowered to do so.”

Hajdu also pointed out that the vast majority of COVID-19 spread is happening within communities, as opposed to being brought into Canada by an outside source.

“I would encourage the premier and his team to continue their hard work to build up testing capacity and use the full testing capacity that the federal government is supporting with billions of dollars,” she said.

Should federal quarantine officers decide to enforce the Quarantine Act, rule breakers could face up to six months in jail and fines up to $750,000.

Meanwhile, police forces can issue tickets up to $1,000.

“The premier should advise the OPP that if he feels they are not fully using the act in the way that they have the authority to do so, that they of course are empowered to do that,” Hajdu said.

Ford said Wednesday that the Ontario police have uncovered over 600 cases wherein people flouted the rules — but none resulted in charges.

“The system is broken,” Ford said. “I need the help from the federal government to make an amendment or change it. Why have our police go around and checking to see if people are quarantining if they aren’t going to follow up with a charge?”

According to The Canadian Press, between March 25 and Sept. 3, police have been asked to check on the whereabouts of 87,338 people ordered to quarantine. Federal data also shows that the RCMP has issued 27 tickets to rule breakers, while the OPP has handed out 14.

“As of Sept. 1, 2020, the RCMP has issued 20 fines totalling just over $18,000 to individuals under the Quarantine Act,” said Cpl. Caroline Duval, a spokesperson for the RCMP, in a statement emailed to CTV News on Sept. 3.

In addition to that, as of Sept. 3, two people have been charged under the Quarantine Act.

With files from The Canadian Press

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De elektrische F-150 van Ford kan een mobiele krachtbron zijn voor werkplekken en m

De elektrische F-150 van Ford kan een mobiele krachtbron zijn voor werkplekken en m

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It’s been a few months since we’ve heard much about Ford’sall-electric F-150. Today, along with announcing a $700 million investment in a Michigan-based, high-tech manufacturing plant, Fordsharednew details about the EV.

The electric F-150 will allow mobile power generation, so customers can use their trucks as power sources on, say, jobsites or campsites. (What else do you do with a truck?) The vehicle will come with dual electric motors, and Ford claims it will have more horsepower and torque than any F-150 available today. It’ll also have the fastest acceleration and be able to tow heavy trailers. 

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WSJ: Mark Zuckerberg gebruikte een privé-Trump-bijeenkomst om TikTok pijn te doen

WSJ: Mark Zuckerberg gebruikte een privé-Trump-bijeenkomst om TikTok pijn te doen

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TikTok has, for its part, pointed accusatory fingers at Facebook, saying that it’s trying to use politics to damage a rival. In July, CEO Kevin Mayerpublished an open lettercalling Facebook out for launching a “another copycat product […] after their other copycat, Lasso, failed quickly.” Mayer added that Facebook was launching “maligning attacks by our competitor — namely Facebook — disguised as patriotism and designed to put an end to our very presence in the US.”

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

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De onderwijsvakbonden van Ontario dienen de uitdaging van de arbeidsraad aan over de plannen voor een pandemie op school – The Globe and Mail

De onderwijsvakbonden van Ontario dienen de uitdaging van de arbeidsraad aan over de plannen voor een pandemie op school – The Globe and Mail

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Students arrive for the first day of classes at École élémentaire catholique Jonathan-Pitre on Aug. 19, 2020 in Manotick, Ont.

Dave Chan/The Globe and Mail

Ontario’s four education unions have filed a labour board challenge over the province’s school plans, saying the Ford government has not adequately addressed health and safety concerns.

Premier Doug Ford shot back at the unions on Monday, portraying them as unco-operative and out of touch – part of an escalating war of words that has been going on for weeks.

The four unions, representing more than 190,000 teachers and education workers, filed formal appeals on Monday with the Ontario Labour Relations Board (OLRB). The unions say the government has failed to put in place “all reasonable precautions for a safe return to school,” particularly to facilitate physical distancing through smaller classes.

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Union leaders said they don’t expect the appeals to interrupt the start of the school year, with some boards returning as early as next week with staggered schedules. But they want the labour board to issue provincial standards around ventilation, transportation, student cohorts and, particularly, physical distancing, which they say cannot be achieved in many schools under the current plans. Sam Hammond, president of the Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario said one teacher recently informed him that she could only separate her students by 35 centimetres in her classroom – far from the widely recommended distance of two metres.

“We are concerned about how this is unfolding, with a week or two away from reopening of schools,” Mr. Hammond said in an interview.

“What the Premier continues to do is point the finger at big bad teachers unions, when in fact all of the concerns that we have raised consistently … continue to be raised by every education stakeholder in the province.”

The province’s strategy will see students in kindergarten through Grade 8 return to school without any reduction in class sizes, although students will spend the day in a single cohort to limit contact with other children.

Most high schoolers will also be in class full-time, although students at some boards across the province will take many of their courses online in a bid to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Mr. Ford said Monday his government has listened to the unions’ concerns and provided millions in funding for better ventilation and enhanced cleaning, and is allowing school boards to use reserve funds to hire more teachers. He said he supports teachers, and many have approached him to apologize for how the unions are acting.

“I’m begging now for the teachers’ unions to work with us,” Mr. Ford said. “Everything that you’ve wanted, we’ve given you … I’m just asking, just once, for your co-operation.”

The Premier said outbreaks in schools are inevitable, with proper protocols in place to handle them – likening it to a team of “stormtroopers” moving in to ensure the correct procedures are followed.

“If [an outbreak] really starts taking off, I will not hesitate for a second to close these schools down,” Mr. Ford said.

Harvey Bischof, president of the Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation (OSSTF), accused Mr. Ford of blaming unions in a “transparent attempt to deflect the focus on his government’s clear incompetence.” Some high schools are returning to part-time classes with 15 students, but other boards will be operating at capacity, he said.

“My members are overwhelmingly anxious, bordering on fear about the return. They are pleading with us to do everything we can to safeguard their health,” Mr. Bischof said. “And I can promise you that many of our members would like to see us recommend significantly more drastic action.”

NDP education critic Marit Stiles said it’s up to the OLRB to make a decision, but the overwhelming message she’s heard from parents is about the need for smaller class sizes.

“This mess, this chaos that we’re experiencing … the fear and the lack of confidence in the government’s approach is at the feet of the Premier,” she said.

With a report from The Canadian Press

Globe health columnist André Picard and senior editor Nicole MacIntyre discuss the many issues surrounding sending kids back to school. André says moving forward isn’t about there being no COVID-19 cases, but limiting their number and severity through distancing, smaller classes, masks and good hygiene.The Globe and Mail

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Dr.Alyce Gullattee, expert op het gebied van middelenmisbruik, sterft op 91-jarige leeftijd

Dr.Alyce Gullattee, expert op het gebied van middelenmisbruik, sterft op 91-jarige leeftijd

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Obituaries|Dr. Alyce Gullattee, Expert on Substance Abuse, Dies at 91

Those We’ve Lost

Dr. Gullattee, who died of the coronavirus, taught at Howard University and served on White House committees for Presidents Nixon, Ford and Carter.

Credit…Bridgette Waters-Turner

This obituary is part of a series about people who have died in the coronavirus pandemic. Read about othershere.

For more than a half-century, Dr. Alyce Gullattee treated countless drug addicts, AIDS patients and prostitutes in Washington, even if it meant taking to some of the city’s more dangerous streets to help those in desperate need.

“Dr. G,” as she was affectionately called by patients, became a nationally recognized expert on substance abuse as an associate professor of psychiatry at Howard University and director of Howard’s Institute on Drug Abuse and Addiction. She served on White House committees on substance abuse for three presidents: Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter.

Dr. Gullattee (pronounced guh-LAH-tee) died on April 30 in Rockville, Md., after testing positive for Covid-19, her daughter Aishaetu Gullattee said. She was 91. She had suffered a stroke in February and had been hospitalized for weeks.

A determined and outspoken advocate, Dr. Gullattee spent a lifetime trying to break down racial barriers for the most vulnerable members of the African-American community.

The Rev. Willie Wilson, a retired pastor at Union Temple Baptist Church in Washington,told NPR in Mayabout the stories he had heard from victims of the drug crisis in the 1980s. “I was working with a lot of people who had problems with substance abuse,” he said, “and they were telling me about this doctor who was going up to 7th and T, into the crack houses, pulling people out and taking them to Howard University for treatment.”

Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick, Howard’s president, said in astatementthat Dr. Gullattee’s service to the university had been “unparalleled.”

“She played a significant role in the education and training of literally thousands of physicians,” he said, “including a significant percentage of the African-American physicians practicing in this country.”

Alyce Chenault was born on June 28, 1928, in Detroit to Bertha and Earl Chenault. Her father stoked furnaces at a Chrysler plant. Though neither of her parents attended high school, they insisted that their children get an education.

Alyce went to the University of California at Santa Barbara, where the environment was hostile for Black students. Frustrated by what she saw as overt racism and a dearth of opportunities, she picketed stores in Santa Barbara where there were no employees of color except in menial positions. She graduated in 1956 with a degree in zoology.

She met her future husband, Latinee Gullattee, at the school, and the couple moved to Washington, where Dr. Gullattee was accepted into the Howard University College of Medicine. After graduating in 1964 as class president, she did her residency at local hospitals and, in 1970, joined the Howard faculty in the department of neuropsychiatry. She would teach there for decades.

In 1971, during the Attica prison uprising in western New York, Dr. Gullattee led a six-person team of doctors from Howard who traveled there to consult with officials about the unrest. Her group was refused entrance to the prison, though white physicians were seen entering and leaving.

“I think they’re in a state of post-siege shock,” shetoldThe New York Times. “They had a far more serious crisis than they thought.”

In addition to her daughter Aishaetu, Dr. Gullattee is survived by another daughter, Deborjha Blackwell; 10 grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchildren.

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Ontario Premier Doug Ford zal dinsdagmiddag een aankondiging doen – CTV Toronto

Ontario Premier Doug Ford zal dinsdagmiddag een aankondiging doen – CTV Toronto

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TORONTO — The Ontario government has issued a formal request for proposals (RFP) for the tunneling work on the Scarborough subway extension, a move that Mayor John Tory says is a “welcome next step” for a project that was first approved by city council back in 2013.

Premier Doug Ford made the announcement alongside Associate Minister of Transportation Kinga Surma on Tuesday afternoon, noting that it was finally time for Scarborough to get its “full share of the pie” when it comes to transit.

He said that the province will invite three teams that were part of the request for qualifications process to participate in the RFP, beginning on Thursday. Metrolinx and Infrastructure Ontario will then award the tunneling contract to the chosen group by mid-2021.

The contract for the rest of the work related to the subway extension will be awarded separately at a later date as part of an effort to expedite work on the project.

“My brother Rob absolutely loved the people of Scarborough and no issue was more important to Rob than delivering rapid underground transit to the people of Scarborough,” Ford said of the late Toronto mayor, who first proposed the three-stop subway extension. “Rob was a true champion for delivering subways to Scarborough and after years of work we are finally making huge, huge progress and as sure as I am standing here today we are going to deliver the full three-stop subway.”

A three-stop, 6.2 kilometre extension of Line 2 from Kennedy Station to Scarborough Town Centre was first approved by city council back in 2013 after then mayor Rob Ford pushed for the cancellation of a fully-funded light rail transit network.

The project, however, was later scaled back in 2017 to include just one station amid rising costs.

Ford then revived the full three-stop vision as part of a $28.5 billion plan to build four new subway lines in the Greater Toronto Area. The new line will travel eight kilometres from Kennedy Station to a new terminus at Sheppard Avenue and McCowan Road.

“There are 650,000 people (in Scarborough) sharing two-and-a-half subway stations. You have Kennedy (Station), you have Warden (Station) and then you have Victoria Park (Station) right on the border. That has been my beef all along,” Ford said on Tuesday. “The people are working their backs off. Imagine you are living out by the zoo and you want to get employment downtown. It will take you an hour-and-a-half if you get on public transit, that is three hours out of your day. Now we are going to build a system that can get people from Point A to Point B a lot quicker.”

Officials with the Ford government have said that the Scarborough subway extension will provide 38,000 people with walking distance access to rapid transit once completed.

They have also estimated that there will be 105,000 additional daily boardings on Line 2 by 2041 as a result of the expansion.

“I thank the Premier for continuing to push this project forward,” Mayor John Tory said in a statement released following Ford’s announcement. “This is a welcome next step that will make sure we have shovels in the ground as soon as possible to get this long-awaited project completed.”

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Ford, Bosch en Bedrock kondigen een geautomatiseerde parkeerservice aan in Detroit

Ford, Bosch en Bedrock kondigen een geautomatiseerde parkeerservice aan in Detroit

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GM en Ford ronden de productie van de ventilator af en schakelen terug naar de autobranch

GM en Ford ronden de productie van de ventilator af en schakelen terug naar de autobranch

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Spin-scooters gaan naar Europa, te beginnen met Duitsland

Spin-scooters gaan naar Europa, te beginnen met Duitsland

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