2020 Audi A6 Allroad krijgt prestatieverbetering van Abt tun

2020 Audi A6 Allroad krijgt prestatieverbetering van Abt tun

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2021 Audi Q5 Sportback bespioneerd, wat geruchten bevestigt

2021 Audi Q5 Sportback bespioneerd, wat geruchten bevestigt

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Audi lanceert high-tech auto-unit Artemis om een ​​'baanbrekende' EV op de markt te brengen

Audi lanceert high-tech auto-unit Artemis om een ​​'baanbrekende' EV op de markt te brengen

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Audi richt Silicon Valley op om geautomatiseerde aandrijfsystemen te ontwikkelen voor de Amerikaanse markt

Audi richt Silicon Valley op om geautomatiseerde aandrijfsystemen te ontwikkelen voor de Amerikaanse markt

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Daniel Abt ontslagen bij Audi's Formule E-team voor het gebruik van professionele sim-coureurs in virtuele races

Daniel Abt ontslagen bij Audi's Formule E-team voor het gebruik van professionele sim-coureurs in virtuele races

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Bentley Flying Spur Review 2020: superieur comfort en prestaties

Bentley Flying Spur Review 2020: superieur comfort en prestaties

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Audi laat driver vallen voor het stiekem een ​​beltoon gebruiken om te strijden in virtuele rac

Audi laat driver vallen voor het stiekem een ​​beltoon gebruiken om te strijden in virtuele rac

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The Internet Games

Audi Drops Driver For Secretly Using a Ringer To Compete In Virtual Race(theverge.com)

Posted by BeauHD from thecheats-never-prosperdept.

Audi hasdropped driver Daniel Abt in the all-electric racing series Formula Eafter he had a pro sim driver surreptitiously race for him during a virtual competition over the weekend. He has also been told to pay 10,000 euros to charity as a result. Abt said Tuesday that he thought the idea would be funny and that he had planned to release a video about the whole ruse. The Verge reports:Abt was supposed to be competing in the fifth round of Formula E’s online sim racing series, which started up in April alongside virtual substitute series from Formula One, NASCAR, and IndyCar. The Formula E sim series was not only meant to give fans something to watch during the pandemic, but it was also supposed to keep the drivers and teams connected, all while raising funds for UNICEF. But Abt had tapped 18-year-old Lorenz Hoerzing, who has been competing in the sim racer section of Formula E’s events, to run in his place. (Hoerzing has since been suspended from the sim racing series as a result.) Abt had someone even appear on the drivers’ group Zoom call under the name “Daniel Abt” dressed in Audi red, but with a microphone blocking his face — a noticeable departure considering Abt’s lively presence on his personal streams of the previous races.

Hoerzing led most of the race in Abt’s virtual car, but he came into contact with Mercedes-Benz driver Stoffel Vandoorne, allowing Nissan driver Oliver Rowland to take the win. This initially raised suspicions because Abt had previouslystruggled to competein the earlier rounds of the virtual championship. The deception really started to unravel after Hoerzing finished third, meaning Abt was supposed to show up for thestandard post-race interviewwith the top three drivers. But he didn’t; Rowland and Vandoorne’s Zoom feeds were instead placed next to a black box with Abt’s name, and the broadcast hosts never even attempted to interview the Audi driver. During his portion of the interview, Vandoorne said was “questioning if it was really Daniel in the car.” Vandoorne vented even more on his personal Twitch channel following the race and eventried to call Abt while streaming, but the Audi driver did not pick up. Organizers of the race were reportedly able to verify that Abt was not racing based on Hoerzing’s IP address.

“I didn’t take it as seriously as I should have,” Abt said after he was caught. “I’m especially sorry about this, because I know how much work has gone into this project on the part of the Formula E organization.” In alater video, Abt said he “won’t be racing” with the Formula E team anymore.

Artificial intelligence has the same relation to intelligence as artificial flowers have to flowers. — David Parnas

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Slankere Lidar brengt Volvo dichter bij het verkopen van een zelfrijdende auto

Slankere Lidar brengt Volvo dichter bij het verkopen van een zelfrijdende auto

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If any automakerhas made its name synonymous with safety, it’s Volvo. The Swedish outfit’s marketing department deserves some credit there, for sure, but they’ve got good stuff to work with. Over the decades,Volvo has led the industrywith three-point seat belts, rear-facing child seats, blind-spot monitoring systems, and more. Now it’s once again in the vanguard, announcing Wednesday that it will be the first automaker to use alidarlaser vision system to enable what it calls “fully autonomous highway driving” in its cars, starting in 2022.

That news is the result of a deal withLuminar, the eight-year-old lidar company helmed by 25-year-old Austin Russell. Instead of the sort ofspinning gumdrop setupused byWaymo,Cruise,Argo, and others making self-driving cars for use in taxi or delivery fleets, Luminar’s lidar is about the size of a VCR tape and fits sleekly into the car’s roof, just above the windshield.

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Lidar systemsshoot out millions of points of lights a second, measuring how long they take to return after bouncing off nearby objects to build a map of their surroundings. Because theyrival cameras for detailwithout the tricky matter of converting 2D pixels into 3D understanding, nearly all self-driving developers consider them a must-have tool. But it’s a young technology—the first one meant for driving appeared in 2005—and thenascent lidar industryhas struggled to hit the right mix of range, resolution, reliability, and cost. It’s especially tricky to make a lidar that can work on a consumer vehicle, where any component that costs more than $1,000 or lasts less than 10 years is a hard sell. That’s the logic underpinningElon Musk’sdismissal of the laser systemin favor of cameras. “Anyone relying on lidar is doomed,” the Tesla CEO said last year.

Volvo’s engineers disagree. “We believe lidar is absolutely a requirement for safe autonomous driving,” says Patrik Björler, who directs Volvo’s autonomous driving and mobility strategy. Current highway-driving systems likeTesla Autopilot,Cadillac Super Cruise, andNissan Pro Pilotrequire the human to remain vigilant, because their cameras and radarscan’t be trusted to spot things like stopped firetrucks. Lidar, Björler says, provides enough detail and reliability to unlock the human’s eyes from the road. And thanks to Luminar, he says, Volvo can make that happen.

Since coming out of stealth in 2017 (five years after its founding), Luminar has formed partnerships with more than 50 companies, including 12 of the world’s 15 biggest automakers. Volvo will be the first to take Luminar’s lidar, which can spot objects from 250 meters away and costs about $500, into series production. The details of that rollout remain scanty: Björler declined to specify which models will get the Luminar treatment or how much the option will cost. We do know the lidar will come as part of the upcoming second generation of the automaker’s “Scalable Product Architecture,” aka Spa2. On pricing, consider that Cadillac charges $2,500 for Super Cruise and Tesla asks $7,000 for Autopilot.

Volvo won’t be the first company with lidar in its cars. In 2018, Audi started using Valeo’s laser system to underpin its highway autonomy system. But because that lidar offers limited range, Audi only allows hands-off driving at speeds below 37 mph. Itcalls the result Traffic Jam Pilot.

Luminar’s lidar system is about the size of a VCR tape and costs about $500 to deploy.

Courtesy of Luminar

Beyond letting the car handle the highway, the addition of lidar could improve Volvo’s active safety systems, like automatic emergency braking andmoose avoidance, to make for a safer ride even when the human is in control. And with over-the-air software updates, those improvements won’t be limited to brand new cars. “It will grow in value over time,” Björner says.

So while the car stays laser-focused on driving, you can put your mind to more pressing matters. Likefinally masteringAnimal Crossing.


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Volvo-auto's zullen tegen 2022 lidar hebben die vergelijkbaar is met zelfrijdende auto's

Volvo-auto's zullen tegen 2022 lidar hebben die vergelijkbaar is met zelfrijdende auto's

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Self-driving cars —

High-end lidar once cost $75,000. Luminar says its lidar costs less than $1,000.

The roof of a high-end sedan.

Enlarge/A Volvo roofline with integrated Luminar lidar sensor.

Volvo will begin producing vehicles with powerful lidar sensors from startup Luminar, the Swedish companyannounced on Wednesday. It’s a significant milestone for the automotive industry as well as a major coup for Luminar. Volvoinvested in Luminarin 2018.

Lidar sensors will be available starting in 2022 as part of the SPA 2 architecture—the successor to the SPA 1 architecture that underlies many of Volvo’s cars today. While Volvo hasn’t announced specific model information, this likely means that the lidar will be available on vehicles like theXC-90starting with the 2023 model year.

While some leading high-end lidars spin 360 degrees, Luminar’s sensors are fixed in place with a 120-degree horizontal field of view. Volvo plans to integrate Luminar’s lidar into the car’s roof just above the windshield, where it will have a good view of the road ahead of the vehicle.

Luminar CEO Austin Russell says the announcement represents years of work bringing down the cost of its technology. Luminar’s technology is built around a relatively exotic type of laser operating at 1,550nm. The fluid in the human eye is opaque to light at this frequency, allowing lidars to use higher power levels without running afoul of eye safety regulations. That helps Luminar’s lidar achieve its impressive 250-meter range.

But the downside is that transmitting and receiving a 1,550nm laser light requires the use of unusual and expensive semiconductor materials like indium-gallium arsenide. That’s in contrast to conventional 905nm lidar systems that can be made using ubiquitous silicon-based components.

But Russell says Luminar has figured out how to bring the cost of its sensor below $1,000 for large-scale customers like Volvo. And he’s hoping that the Volvo deal will catch the attention of other carmakers who are also considering adding lidar to their own vehicles.

That’s particularly impressive because industry leader Velodynecharged as much as $75,000for sensors with comparable range and resolution (albeit with a 360-degree field of view Luminar’s lidar lacks) just a few years ago.

Volvo is aiming for “eyes off” autonomy, at least on highways

The Volvo XC90 interior.

Enlarge/The Volvo XC90 interior.

Technically, Volvo won’t be the first automaker to sell a car with a lidar sensor. That honor goes to Audi, whoseA7andA8vehicles have come with a lidar sensor called theScala, designed by Ibeo and manufactured by Valeo, for a couple of years now. But the Scala was an extremely basic lidar sensor, with only four lines of vertical resolution and a maximum range of just 80 meters. A low-end lidar like this can help with driver-assistance and emergency braking features—”level 2″ systems in industry jargon—but they’re probably not good enough for driverless operation.

By contrast, Luminar’s lidar offers performance comparable to the spinning lidars you see atop fully self-driving vehicle prototypes. It can detect millions of points per second—enough to build a truly three-dimensional point cloud to guide autonomous navigation. As far as we know, no other automaker has committed to putting such a powerful lidar in production vehicles.

Volvo says that the addition of the Luminar lidar—along with other technology improvements over the next two years—will enable Volvo to offer truly autonomous highway driving.

Volvo’s Henrik Greenwritesthat, when a customer activates Volvo’s self-driving feature, “Volvo takes responsibility for the driving and you can relax, take your eyes off the road and your hands off the wheel.” He adds that “over time, updates over the air will expand the areas in which the car can drive itself.”

This suggests that Volvo’s technology will be similar toGM’s industry-leading Super Cruise technologyin that its use will be limited to specific highways that have been pre-mapped by the manufacturer. However, it will differ from Super Cruise—as well as Tesla’s Autopilot, Volvo’s current Pilot Assist, and similar products from other carmakers—in that drivers willnothave to pay attention to the road while the feature is active.

Volvo hopes to succeed where Audi failed

The Audi A8.

Enlarge/The Audi A8.

Jonathan Gitlin

This claim will sound familiar to industry insiders because Audimade a similar claimfor its own lidar-equipped vehicles three years ago.

“When the car takes over, it takes over, and the car has responsibility, allowing the driver to relax,” an Audi rep told us in 2017. “The added value of a self-driving car isn’t the driving itself; it’s getting time back.”

But Audi recentlyadmittedit was giving up on its quest to make Audi the first so-called level 3 self-driving system. The company blamed a lack of regulatory clarity.

Luminar CEO Austin Russell, whose company is slated to provide some pieces of Volvo’s self-driving software stack as well as its lidar sensor, believes Volvo can succeed where Audi failed.

“The problem was the technology didn’t work,” Russell said of Audi’s effort. He argued that Valeo’s lidar simply wasn’t sophisticated enough to enable truly autonomous highway operation and that Luminar’s much more sophisticated lidar is up to the task.

“It takes hundreds of people and realistically upwards of a billion dollars to successfully develop an autonomous stack” for highway use, he said, adding that urban applications are even more challenging.

Volvo’s 2022 cars won’t be true robotaxis

Luminar CEO Austin Russell.

Enlarge/Luminar CEO Austin Russell.

Luminar

While Volvo and Luminar are aiming to offer the most sophisticated self-driving technology on the market by 2022, those 2022 vehicles will also have an important limitation: they’ll only have a single forward-facing lidar unit. There won’t be a spinning lidar on the roof with a 360-degree field of view. There also won’t be fixed lidars pointing to the sides, to the back, or providing short-range coverage of the road immediately around the vehicle.

That means that these Volvo cars may never be capable of the kind of fully autonomous operation that would allow the vehicles to operate in crowded city streets or to drive around without anyone inside of them. While Volvo hopes to expand the number of roads where its technology works via future software updates, there will probably always be areas where these cars have to hand control back to a human driver.

But even with those limitations, Volvo is setting an ambitious goal for itself. Until now, every carmaker has forced drivers to pay attention to the road when they use its driver-assistance technology. That has given the technology a safety net and carmakers a shield against liability if anything goes wrong.

If Volvo follows through on its plan to offer true “eyes off” technology, by contrast, Volvo would likely be liable for any resulting crashes. So its executives will want to be very, very sure that its cars can operate safely in every situation before they ship the first vehicle.

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BMW iX3 gelekt

BMW iX3 gelekt

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Byon April 27, 2020

BMW’si4 Conceptmay be the EV the brand currently has to promote, but it’s the iX3 that’s poised to become the brand’s all-electric cash cow. It’s entering a market space most other manufacturers agreed showed enough promise to launch other reasonably sized, plug-in crossovers (e.g. Tesla Model Y, Mercedes EQC, Jaguar E-Pace, Audi E-Tron). These are the vehicles seen as helping EVs pitch into the mainstream, offering both the planet’s preferred body style and adequate range for most commuters.

Up until now, we’ve seen most of what the industry has to offer in the premium electric crossover segment. Even the iX3 has been thrice teased by the manufacturer since announcing its existence at Auto China in 2018. But those were typically issued to us as conceptual renderings between spy shots of a vehicle that looked very much like the standard BMW X3. Recently leaked online, the production-ready iX3 hasn’t altered that opinion. In fact, it’s probably destined to end up being the most normal-looking EV on sale for a while. 

Two official press photos were apparentlyposted to a dummy Instagram accountbefore being scooped up by car-spy website CocheSpias.

“@scott26.unofficial has shared the first photos of the BMW iX3 on his account,”the outlet wrote on Monday (translated from spanish), “What do you think? You like?”

Visually, it’s extremely similar to the gas-powered X3 — with a few embellishments to help indicate that it’snotthat model. As with other BMW EVs, the crossover has blue accent lighting running along its flanks. There are likewise some blue-hued trim bits on the bumper (where exhaust ports would be) and grille. The front clip is also different, closing up some ducting (presumably to improve aerodynamics) and removing space for things like fog lamps. The only other items signaling that this isn’t a standard X3 is the large silver cap near the driver-side door and a unique wheel design that’s highly reminiscent of other BMW i vehicles.

Those items also help us compare the car in question with spy shots of BMW test vehicles, giving us high confidence that these images are either legitimate or top-tier forgeries.

BMW has previously said the iX3 would use a 74-kilowatt-hour battery with a single electric motor driving the rear wheels. Presently, that unit is estimated to make 286 horsepower and 296 pound-feet of torque. Under Europe’s WLTP testing cycle, that’s supposed to be good for a maximum range of 273 miles. EPA figures will likely tamp that number down, though BMW has said it doesn’t intend on entering the model in the North America market right now.

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